3 Fun Ways to Play with a Jump Rope

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Information By: Stephanie Barkan, PT, DPT

Edited By: Stephanie Boron, M.S., CCC-SLP

Jump roping is a great activity to build strength, coordination, and timing. You can play by yourself or in a group with 2 people turning the rope and 1 jumping. While traditional jump roping is fun, there are so many other exciting ways you can use a jump rope! Read on for 3 fun jump rope ideas.

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The Importance of Home Practice

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By: Amanda Bird, M.A., CCC-SLP
With the constant to-do lists, meetings, errands, and appointments, it may seem nearly impossible to fit in some home practice of your child’s therapy goals. We understand! However, the benefits may make you reconsider putting it on the back burner. Read on to find out some of the reasons and recommendations for practicing these skills outside of the session: Continue reading

Questions to Ask When You’re Looking for a Summer Camp

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Info By: Micki Sommerman

Edited By: Stephanie Boron, M.S., CCC-SLP

The groundhog saw his shadow, but that hasn’t stopped us here at the clinic from dreaming of summer! Many of our families are starting to ask about summer camps for their kiddos. Stay tuned for Beth Osten and Associates summer camps for 2017. In the mean time, here are some questions to ask when you’re looking for a summer camp.

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Tips for Improving Transitions

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By: Amanda Bird, M.A., CCC-SLP

Let’s face it: transitions can be HARD. Do you find it to be difficult for your child to transition between activities? From the breakfast table to the car for school? From playtime to bedtime? From his or her favorite game to dinner? Here are some tips to help ease transitions and promote a smoother and more successful morning, afternoon, and night.

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Does My Child Need Physical Therapy?

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Information By: Stephanie Barkan, PT, DPT

Edited By: Stephanie Boron, M.S., CCC-SLP

As a pediatric physical therapist, I work with children of all ages to help correct movement dysfunction and promote the development of age-appropriate gross motor skills. Often times, parents may have a concern regarding their child’s motor development and whether what they are seeing is typical. While regular visits with your child’s pediatrician will help to monitor if any major developmental milestones are not on target, there are many observations you can make as a caregiver regarding your child’s gross motor skills. This will look different across all ages. It is also important to remember that each child grows and develops differently, and that a timeline is relative due to each child’s unique characteristics. While physical therapy is often recommended for a child with a medical diagnosis or following a surgery, there are many other reasons why your child may benefit from treatment. If you do notice any of the following, it is best to discuss your findings with your pediatrician and a pediatric physical therapist. Read on for some tips on what to look for:

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